Welcome to Alison Brie Fan, a fansite source dedicated to the talented actress Alison Brie. Alison is perhaps best known for her roles as Annie Edison in the television series Community (2009–2015), and Trudy Campbell in Mad Men (2007–2015). Alison currently stars as Ruth Wilder in the Netflix comedy series GLOW. Here you can find the latest news and more! Thank you for visiting.

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11 September 2011

2011 Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards

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Alison attended the 2011 Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards last night at Nokia Theatre in L.A., where she walked the red carpet and announced the winners for Best Hairstyle. She looked gorgeous and it looks like she had a lot of fun. I’ve added many HQ’s and MQ’s to the gallery:

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Appearances > 2011 > 2011 Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards

LOS ANGELES (AP) — “Boardwalk Empire” captured a leading seven trophies at the creative arts Emmy Awards, with Gwyneth Paltrow and Justin Timberlake earning TV comedy series guest-star honors.

Paltrow, recognized for “Glee,” and Timberlake, a winner for hosting “Saturday Night Live,” were no-shows at Saturday’s ceremony for technical and other achievements. It preceded the main Sept. 18 Emmy show.

“She couldn’t be here because it’s happy hour at the Starlight Room,” presenter and “Community” actress Alison Brie joked about Paltrow’s absence.

Timberlake received his award for hosting a “Saturday Night Live” episode and shared in another Emmy for co-writing his opening monologue, in which he crooned about not wanting to sing.

“Justin Timberlake really wanted to be here but we said no, they want to see the writers,” ”SNL” head writer Seth Myers told the audience.

“Boardwalk Empire,” which stars Steve Buscemi as a Prohibition-era politico in Atlantic City, N.J., earned trophies for categories including art direction, picture editing and makeup.

Loretta Devine was honored as best guest actress in a drama series for “Grey’s Anatomy,” with Paul McCrane earning the category’s best actor award for “Harry’s Law.”

Fired “Two and a Half Men” star Charlie Sheen, the subject of a Comedy Central “roast” taping across town Saturday, was at the ceremony in spirit as his former co-star Jon Cryer and series creator Chuck Lorre presented awards in the casting category.

Lorre said he’d been urged to share funny stories about casting, asking Cryer: “What do you think? Got any amusing anecdotes?”

“Uh, none that amuses me,” Cryer replied.

“Drawing a blank,” Lorre concluded.

“America’s Most Wanted” host John Walsh received the Governors Award, and said backstage that he had received offers from Fox, which dropped the show, and CNN to do news commentary. He turned them down.

“I said to Fox, all I really want to do is catch bad guys and find missing children,” Walsh said. “This is the only thing I know how to do on television.”

He’ll be hosting a new version of the show on the Lifetime network and hopes to expand internationally.

Howie Mandel teased next week’s Emmy Awards, saying: “This is great. These are the creative Emmys. Unlike the Emmys next week, where there’s no creativity at all.”

HBO earned a leading 15 awards Saturday, followed by PBS with 10, Fox with nine, CBS with seven and NBC with five. ABC won three awards, behind the four each for Discovery Channel and History.

The creative arts ceremony will air Sept. 17 on ReelzChannel, which earned three awards for the controversial miniseries “The Kennedys.” The 63rd annual prime-time Emmy ceremony, with “Glee” star Jane Lynch as host, will air live the next night on Fox.

Other winners at the creative arts Emmys included:

Host, reality or reality-competition series: Jeff Probst, “Survivor,” CBS.

Voice-over performance: Maurice LaMarche, “Futurama: Lrrreconcilable Ndndifferences,” Fox.

Reality program: “Deadliest Catch,” Discovery.

Commercial: “Born of Fire: Chrysler 200.”

Animated Program: “Futurama: The Late Philip J. Fry,” Comedy Central.

Nonfiction series: “American Masters,” PBS.

Writing for a variety, music or comedy series: “64th Annual Tony Awards,” CBS.

Music composition for a series (original dramatic score): “American Masters: John Muir In The New World,” PBS.

Music composition for a miniseries, movie or special: “Mildred Pierce: Part Five,” HBO.

Choreography (juried award: possibility of more than one award): Two awards, “So You Think You Can Dance,” Fox.

Casting for a drama series: “Boardwalk Empire,” HBO.

Casting for a miniseries, movie or a special: “Mildred Pierce,” HBO.

Casting for a comedy series: “Glee,” Fox.

Costumes for a miniseries, movie or a special: “Downton Abbey Part 1 (Masterpiece),” PBS.

Costumes for a variety-music program or a special (more than one award possible): “Gettysburg,” History.

Costumes for a series: “The Borgias: Lucrezia’s Wedding,” Showtime. {Assosiated Press}

14 July 2011

Alison & Gillian in Gentlemen’s Quarterly

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They spend a lot of time together, these two, making their scrappy, genre-warping sitcom, “Community,” posing for instantly viral almost-make-out TwitPics, and hanging off-set with their lace-tight castmates. What we’re saying—as if the photo isn’t evidence enough—is there’s sugar between these two, they’re a team. “With a shoot like this,” Alison Brie (left) says, “you’re negotiating these positions together: ‘Can you move your crotch a little to the left? Really get it up there.’ ”

“The next day we were texting each other,” Gillian Jacobs adds. ” ‘Are you sore, too?’ ”

“Community,” now two seasons deep, seemed to figure itself out almost instantly—embracing weird, risky habits like engineering entire episodes as film parodies and building in layers-deep Easter eggs for its devotees. Not to mention the wire-sharp quips traded by the members of the show’s lightly dysfunctional study group.

Brie’s character, Annie, who protests indecency in a register that conjures a conductor on his tiptoes, couldn’t be more of an innocent, fizzy contradiction to the actress. Annie, on “Community”: never seen a penis. Brie, in an essay she wrote about deflowering her gay friend: “My vagina would have been his road to salvation!” Which is to say, the girls are willing to embrace the funny in sex. “It’s just so deadly serious to each of us but hilarious to everyone else,” Jacobs says. “When you’re having sex with someone,” Brie adds, “it really is similar to putting yourself out there and saying, ‘I think this is funny and I hope you laugh.’ ”

“Fake it till you make it,” Jacobs says. “That’s what my drama teacher used to say.”

Brie: “I don’t think she was talking about sex.”

Jacobs, whose Britta has “slept with two-thirds of the male population” at the show’s school, is playing opposites, too: “The episode where I made out with my supposed lesbian friend was the first time I’d kissed a girl. I was terrified.”

Brie: “Aw, Gil! You should have let me know! We could have practiced!”

{GQ.com}

21 May 2011

New Galley Version!

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We have a brand new layout version up at the gallery! A huge thanks goes to Laura over Raspberry Crush Designs, who designed the layout for us. This time it’s very colorfull and bright and it features a photoshoot of the Antenna magazine Alison did back in 2010.